“Recklessness” by Philip Mescaz and the terrible Rossini Street children

In 2014, the story “Two Boys” rekindled the author’s passion for one of his fellow students at La Rochelle High School. It is clearly named: Herve Guibert, the great futurist writer, whose work and destiny continue to fuel an intense focal point of admiration.

“Recklessness” occurs immediately after a breakup …

In 2014, the story “Two Boys” rekindled the author’s passion for one of his fellow students at La Rochelle High School. It is clearly named: Herve Guibert, the great futurist writer, whose work and destiny continue to fuel an intense focal point of admiration.

“L’Insouciance” takes place after the separation from Guibert, circa 1975. This time, the book is classified as a novel. A young man of exceptional beauty, with an arrogant pallor, as blond as an evil angel, plans to write about his aunts, bound in a hopeless friendship with an already famous actress, Isabelle Adjani: the reader will not know how to be misled on the subject of this “departed love” that drives the narrator to leave Paris, inspiring him with a burning desire to new life, and urges him to accept an unexpected invitation from a pleasant curator, director of the Musée de Nice: “Come, think of this stay as arches, or a holiday, or the beginning of something else, a side road…”


Villa Massina, one of the museums of Nice, whose narrator for a few months will share life, exhibitions and collections.

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His name was Milo

We say yes, and find ourselves in a small shaded room in the Palazzo Massena, sharing the life of the museum, its exhibitions and its collections (but the Cheret Museum is where Carolus Doran and Van Dongen fascinate), having an affair with the master of the place, ten years older than him, without any sexual confusion, a relationship Made with “complicity bounded by tact”. Without any ambiguity? The narrator is annoyed by the way his host has put him forward, seems flattered by the gossip, finds him a Penelope Fillon-style job, and even dresses for the boring formal parties that the protege surreptitiously leaves to flirt with the garden of Albert IVerse.

There may also be comedic moments in this new classic “madness” of the Promenade des Anglais. Giscard crosses, and appears on the balcony like the Queen of England, while Anne Aemon is worried: So many people are pushing against the fence. Will you suffer the fate of Marie Antoinette at Versailles?

This novel is light and serious, all filled with a “radiant sadness” that I borrowed from the city of Nice

Two other places irresistibly attract the narrator. On the promenade, Villa Orlamonde where Maeterlinck lived, then a deserted ruin conducive to reverence, and at his feet, some rocks and a cove, Coco-Beach. We hang out there naked, meet people there. The beginning of the book: “I remember this boy in Nice, his name is Milo. An ordinary person on this beach chases the story with his luminous, mysterious, good and tragic character.

“The Magnificent Trinity”

The narrator is a cat, an “expert in flying,” who inherited a nomadic propensity from his parents. In Villa Massina, boredom seized him. He meets Paulina, George, and Gaspard, whom the coordinator calls the “Wonderful Trinity.” It’s a clan so locked-down that the newcomer joins his roommate without difficulty, and Gaspard moves away and joins 18 Rossini Street. They are gay, spoiled, deceitful, free, careless. Sometimes he’s tough (they play a bad trick on Mr. O’Reilly, a former pastry chef who looks like Mrs. Tartine, and insult the “witches”, these two decent old gentlemen, with a Bentley and chauffeur, used, with young GHBs before the hour). Trinity is our snapshot of a happy adoptive family, where everyone comes and goes. Their jokes and tumults often remind us of the terrible Cocteau children.

This novel is light and serious, filled with a “radiant sadness” borrowed from the city of Nice. The most beautiful scene? The narrator’s grandmother conveyed to him the taste of the tombs. Walking on the side of the castle hill in the Jewish cemetery. One grave is less discreet than the others. Two concrete cubes and three small pictures. The face of a child, Silvio, who died in the early thirties, and two of his toys, a plane, a car. It’s Panhard & Levassor. So this carefree young man, who is in love with Malherr’s “Kindertotenlieder,” sings to the dead boy “At the Garage Door.” By being careful to roll the letter “r”, and pronouncing it like Trenet: “Pannard.”

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